The Bromance: Undergraduate Male Friendships and the Expansion of Contemporary Homosocial Boundaries

Robinson, Stefan and Anderson, Eric and White, Adam (2017) The Bromance: Undergraduate Male Friendships and the Expansion of Contemporary Homosocial Boundaries. Sex Roles. pp. 1-13. ISSN 0360-0025

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Abstract

The present study provides the first known qualitative examination of heterosexual undergraduate men’s conceptualization and experiences of the bromance, outside research on cinematic representations. Drawing on semi-structured interviews with 30 undergraduate men enrolled in one of four undergraduate sport-degree programs at one university in the United Kingdom, we find these heterosexual men to be less reliant on traditional homosocial boundaries, which have previously limited male same-sex friendships. Contrary to the repressive homosociality of the 1980s and 1990s, these men embrace a significantly more inclusive, tactile, and emotionally diverse approach to their homosocial relationships. All participants provided comparable definitions of what a bromance is and how it operates, all had at least one bromantic friend, and all suggested that bromances had more to offer than a standard friendship. Participants described a bromance as being more emotionally intimate, physically demonstrative, and based upon unrivalled trust and cohesion compared to their other friendships. Participants used their experiences with romances and familial relations as a reference point for considering the conditions of a bromance. Results support the view that declining homophobia and its internalization has had significantly positive implications for male expression and intimacy. Conclusions are made about the bromance’s potential to improve men’s mental health and social well-being because participants indicate these relationships provide a space for emotional disclosure and the discussion of potentially traumatic and sensitive issues.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: L Social studies > L390 Sociology not elsewhere classified
Departments: Faculty of Business, Law and Sport > Department of Sport & Exercise
Depositing User: Adam White
Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2017 14:53
Last Modified: 02 May 2018 00:00
URI: http://repository.winchester.ac.uk/id/eprint/720

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